Constructing a Complexity Theory of Human Interaction Dynamics (HID)

Date: August 12, 2013

Place: Buena Vista (Orlando), Florida

The caucus will explore the implications of complexity-inspired research that seeks to understand human interaction dynamics (HID) and to identify the nonlinear interaction mechanisms that underlie successful organizing, leadership and management. Leadership and management research typically focuses on individual motivation and action or on organizational processes and structures such as operating or dynamical capabilities. In contrast, the field of human interaction dynamics (HID) focuses on complex interactions within social and resource networks and how these interactions result in efficacious individual and collective outcomes.

The field is enabled by increasing access to data from online interactions, social media, and the availability of computational power. These sources—when combined with advanced qualitative techniques that include varying individual perspectives are organising occurs—offer the potential to study and describe complex and nonlinear aspects of human interactions and organizing as these unfold over time. To inform data definition, gathering, and analysis, theory is needed to connect these data and varying perspectives using the scientific knowledge from other disciplines to weave social science into the broader scientific tapestry.

PowerPoints used in the discussion are available below.

AOM2013-CAUCUS-HID-HANDOUT-Short.pdf


 

INFORMS Annual Conference 2012

Phoenix, AZ, USA, Oct 14 - 17

 
 

SECTION: Organization Science

 TOPIC:    Technology Management


Session Information

Monday Oct 15, 08:00 - 09:30


Title: 

Exploring the Process of Emergent Innovation: Knowledge Creation and Invention in Complex Adaptive Systems

Chair: 

  James K. Hazy

Professor, Adelphi University, 1 South Avenue, Garden City NY, USA

Visiting Professor, Märardalen University, Sweden

Contact: hazy@adelphi.edu


 
 

Title: 

Processes for incremental vs. radical innovation

  Presenting Author:  

  Tomas Backström,Professor, Mälardalen University, P.O. Box 325,

  Eskilstuna 63105, Sweden, tomas.backstrom@mdh.se

 
Abstract:    Are there qualitative differences in the processes behind incremental and radical innovation? Incremental innovation is described as a process of emergence leading to continuously improving fitness of the system. Radical innovation is described as a punctuated development, where innovation maturity increases during the quiet times, to be used for jumps of fitness improvements when needed. But the increase of innovation maturity is a process of emergence.
 

 

Title: 

Space for Emergent Innovation

  Presenting Author:     Erik Lindhult,Mälardalen University, erik.lindhult@mdh.se
 
Abstract:   The paper will explore the meaning and role of space – chronological, economic, social, cultural - for the emergence of innovation in services, processes and products, based on research from different organizational settings. This calls for “space management” as an important innovation leadership task from a complexity perspective.
   

Title: 

Emergent Innovation as a Ratcheting Process that Accumulates Positive Deviations

  Presenting Author:  

  James Hazy,Professor, Adelphi University, 1 South Avenue, Garden City

  NY, USA and Mälardalen University Sweden, Sweden, hazy@adelphi.edu

  Co-Author:  

  Tom Shinick,Professor, Adelphi University, 1 South Avenue, Garden City

  NY  08833, United States of America, shinick@adelphi.edu

 
Abstract:   Inventions can be observed as assignable deviations from the norm with positive though unrealized potential. Innovation recognizes, captures, and preserves inventions in a ratcheting process. By accumulating inventions, it evolves what is seen as normal activity in a positive direction with regards fitness. At each click of the ratchet, new information about what works is embedded in the system, events becomes more predictable, and additional recombination potentialities are created.
   


Discussion Caucus: Human Interaction Dynamics (HID): Developing a Complexity Research Agenda

Date: August 6, 2012,  

Time: 1:15PM to 2:45PM

Place: Holmes Room of Boston Park Plaza, Boston Massachusetts USA

Sponsored by the Academy of Management

Registration required. For information, follow this link.

Symposium Abstract is available here.

Description:

There is an increasing recognition that the link between individual action and organizational processes and outcomes needs to be better understood.  At the same time, cross-level research presents unique challenges to traditional methods.  Complexity science offers a framework and provides the prospect for new methods that show promise. A research agenda in this area will be developed at this caucus.

The caucus will be cross-functional bringing together more than twenty scholars from various specialties many of whom will be presenting their work at symposia and other venues in the academic program. It will explore the current state and future research potential for the complexity-inspired field of human interaction dynamics (HID). HID uses various techniques and the complex systems theoretical framework to study the nature of fine-grained human interactions and the coarse-grained organizing forms that emerge from these dynamics. Treating human interactions as the unit of analysis, HID explores the unique and heterogeneous detail  within the micro-states that occur during interactions - including the rules that govern these interactions, how they are enacted, and how they change. This heterogeneity makes the human interaction very different from the types of interactions normally studied in the natural sciences.


Symposium: The Human Interaction as Unit of Analysis

Date: August 6, 2012,  

Time: 3:00PM to 4PM

Place: Berkley B Room of Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston Massachusetts USA

Sponsored by the Academy of Management

Registration required. For information, follow this link.

Symposium Abstract is available here.

Description:

The symposium will explore the nature of human interactions within the conceptual framework of the relatively new complexity-inspired field of human interaction dynamics (HID). Management and leadership research typically focuses on individual motivation and action, or on organizational processes and structures such as operating or dynamical capabilities. In contrast, HID studies the complex nature of human interactions in all their unique and heterogeneous detail or micro-states (called fine-grained interactions) ─ including the rules that govern these interactions, how they are enacted, and how they change ─ and the structures and properties that emerge from these interactions that can be treated in abstract terms as macro-states where less important details are ignored (called coarse-grained organizing forms.

This symposium will further the conversation about the nature, content and relevance of the human-to-human interaction itself in all of its complicating uniqueness and detail, its role in establishing and altering individual and shared identities, and its role in creating and altering shared abstract models of regularities in the ecosystem that can be used to positive affect by individuals to inform choice and action in anticipation of events. 


Academic Paper Presentation

Leadership as Process: A theory of formal and informal organizing in complex adaptive systems     

Author: James K. Hazy, Adelphi University, IRCS

Date: August 6, 2012,  

Time: 4:15PM to 6:45PM

Place: Ballroom C at Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston Massachusetts USA

Sponsored by the Academy of Management

Registration required. For information, follow this link.

Paper is available here.

Description:

Organization theorists have increasingly recognized the need to incorporate dynamic processes that include individual intentionality into theories of organizing. In particular, the leadership and human interaction aspects of organizing and their role in the development of organizational and managerial capabilities have been identified as an under researched area. This paper addresses this gap. Using complexity-informed theories of human interaction dynamics (HID), the paper defines leadership as the process that evolves organizational capabilities. More specifically, it describes three leadership processes that serve three system survival functions, and it identifies three mechanisms that operate locally to enable organizing through local interactions within a complex adaptive system. In sum, leadership evolves the ways in which individuals interact with one another to survive and prosper as collectives. It thus shapes the particular expression of dynamic, operating and managerial capabilities that emerge from these interactions within the ecosystem. Eleven propositions are averred.